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VOICE A WILD DREAM: MOMENTS IN ASIAN AMERICAN ART AND ACTIVISM, 1968-2022

Voice a Wild Dream: Moments in Asian American Art and Activism, 1968-2022 highlights collectives of Asian American artists and activists and their work toward social change over the past six decades. Sharpened by a recent interest among artists in remaking systems in ways that harken back to the revolutionary impulses of the late 1960’s, many exhibitions and publications trace the lineages of feminist, queer, black, and Chicanx arts and activism; however, the story intertwining strands of art, activism, and community aid is significantly less visible within the Asian American community. 

On exhibition at Oxy Arts:  

4757 York Boulevard 
Los Angeles, CA 90042 

Click here for more information.

MAF Abolitionist V. Reforms Tool

The Muslim Abolitionist Futures (MAF) Network is working towards building a world where we all live with dignity, freedom and justice. MAF’s goal is to abolish the “Global War on Terror (GWOT).” GWOT is a system of death and destruction that exists through policies, programs, and laws that target Muslim communities, communities racialized as Muslim, and more broadly Black and Brown communities targeted under the false guise of national security.  

This tool was developed by the Muslim Abolitionist Futures Network’s Abolition and Policy Working Group that is led by Muslims for Just Futures. Muslim Abolitionist Futures is a network of grassroots organizations across the country, and is co-anchored by Muslims for Just Futures, Vigilant Love, HEART Women & Girls, and Queer Crescent. The goal of this tool is to support organizations, collectives, groups, and community members committed to moving with abolitionist values in their policy advocacy efforts. The intention is to support groups and community members discern the type of policies that expand and further entrench the Global War on Terror, and the type of policies that can move us toward its abolition. The hope is to share a framework for policy objectives and oversight demands that move us toward our collaborative vision of abolition to the “Global War on Terror.” View the tool here. 

The Stories We Tell, and Don’t Tell, About Asian-American Lives

In the mid-nineties, David Eng was a professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia, and Shinhee Han, a psychotherapist, worked for the school’s counselling and psychological services. After a seemingly popular Korean-American undergraduate at Columbia committed suicide, Eng and Han got to talking about what seemed, to them, like a wave of depression afflicting the school’s Asian-American students, and about how unsettling they found it that so few of their colleagues had attended the student’s funeral. There were many Asian-American students at Columbia, but Eng and Han had noticed that these students often spoke, in the classroom and at the clinic, of feeling invisible, as if their inner lives were of little concern to those outside their immediate community. 

Read the full story here.

‘I Felt Like We Are All Chinese — We Can Take Care of Each Other’ Nannies open up about the Asian class divide

Asians and Pacific Islanders belong to the most economically divided racial group in America, and the need for child care often brings together members from the top and bottom of the ladder. White-collar Chinese Americans might employ care workers from the Philippines or China; Indian American families, among the wealthiest ethnic groups in the country, might hire domestic workers from Nepal, one the poorest countries in South Asia. Perhaps nowhere is the tension between the diverse experiences of being Asian American more evident than in these households. We spoke to five Asian immigrant nannies and au pairs (all of whom requested that we use pseudonyms) living in the New York area to find out how — if at all — their relationships with their employers changed over the past two years.

Read the full story here.